Still a Man

Still a Man Panel

As the eyes of the world turn toward Memphis for MLK50, we wanted to prepare for the important conversations happening in our city. In February, our teaching pastors preached four important sermons on topics that led Dr. King to Memphis 50 years ago. The series culminated with a panel discussion led by influential figures in our city who helped us reflect back and also to look forward about those issues, how they remain today, successes and failures since then and ways forward with racial reconciliation. Panelists included:

  • W.J. Michael Cody, former lawyer of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Rev. Kenneth S. Robinson, M.D., President/CEO of United Way of the Mid-South
  • Rev. Dr. Deborah Smith, District Superintendent of the Memphis Metro District of the United Methodist Church
  • Moderators: Senior Pastor Dr. Shane Stanford & Minister-at-Large Dr. Maxie Dunnam, Christ Church Memphis
 

SERMON Audio

 
 

SUGGESTED RESOURCES

Throughout the month, these four recommended resources will be available in the Lampost Library and for sale at the Still a Man Panel. 

God's very good idea is to have lots of different people enjoying loving him and loving each other. This stunningly illustrated journey from the garden of Eden to God's heavenly throne room shows how despite our sinfulness, everyone can be a part of God's very good idea through the saving work of Christ.

This book will help children see how people from all ethnic and social backgrounds are valuable to God and how Jesus came to rescue all kinds of people. It will also excite them about being part of church. PURCHASE

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.
 
Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice. PURCHASE
 

On April 4, 1968, James Earl Ray shot Martin Luther King at the Lorraine Motel. The nation was shocked, enraged, and saddened. As chaos erupted across the country and mourners gathered at King's funeral, investigators launched a sixty-five day search for King’s assassin that would lead them across two continents. With a blistering, cross-cutting narrative that draws on a wealth of dramatic unpublished documents, Hampton Sides, bestselling author of Ghost Soldiers, delivers a non-fiction thriller in the tradition of William Manchester's The Death of a President and Truman Capote's In Cold Blood. With Hellhound On His Trail, Sides shines a light on the largest manhunt in American history and brings it to life for all to see. PURCHASE

Through a nationwide telephone survey of 2,000 people and an additional 200 face-to-face interviews, Michael O. Emerson and Christian Smith probed the grassroots of white evangelical America. They found that despite recent efforts by the movement's leaders to address the problem of racial discrimination, evangelicals themselves seem to be preserving America's racial chasm. In fact, most white evangelicals see no systematic discrimination against blacks. But the authors contend that it is not active racism that prevents evangelicals from recognizing ongoing problems in American society. Instead, it is the evangelical movement's emphasis on individualism, free will, and personal relationships that makes invisible the pervasive injustice that perpetuates racial inequality. Most racial problems, the subjects told the authors, can be solved by the repentance and conversion of the sinful individuals at fault.
Combining a substantial body of evidence with sophisticated analysis and interpretation, the authors throw sharp light on the oldest American dilemma. In the end, they conclude that despite the best intentions of evangelical leaders and some positive trends, real racial reconciliation remains far over the horizon. PURCHASE